Categories
Internet Politics

How lobbyists are denying you a voice and destroying democracy

I came across an unsurprising but nonetheless disconcerting revelation today that is gives a very good example of what most of us knew all along: that “public comment” process are routinely subverted by commercial interests, generally at the public’s expense. It comes in the form of a smoking gun courtesy DSL Reports: Who Knew Senior […]

Categories
Future Internet

Crystal ball: Data-only carriers to destroy the telco industry RSN

This is one of those random thoughts that fits in a tweet but deserves a little more explanation. Like most I currently pay around €100 a month for a mobile package that includes some texts, airtime (2+2 hours on and off peak), some data and usually some useless gimmicks (free calls at certain times or […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Organising the Internet with Web Categories

In order to scratch an itch relating to the Open Cloud Computing Interface (OCCI) I submitted my first Internet-Draft to the IETF this week: Web Categories (draft-johnston-http-category-header). The idea’s fairly simple and largely inspired by the work of others (most notably the original HTTP and Atom authors, and a guy down under who’s working on […]

Categories
Cloud Internet

The browser is the OS (thanks to Firefox 3.5, Chrome 2, Safari 4)

Almost a year ago I wrote about Google Chrome: Cloud Operating Environment and [re]wrote the Google Chrome Wikipedia article, discussing the ways in which Google was changing the game through new and innovative features. They had improved isolation between sites (which is great for security), improved usability (speed dial, tear off tabs, etc.) and perhaps […]

Categories
Cloud Internet

Is HTTP the HTTP of cloud computing?

Ok so after asking Is OCCI the HTTP of cloud computing? I realised that the position may have already been filled and that the question was more Is AtomPub already the HTTP of cloud computing? After all my strategy for OCCI was to follow Google’s example with GData by adding some necessary functionality (a search […]

Categories
Cloud Internet Standards

rel=shortlink: url shortening that really doesn’t hurt the internet

Inspired primarily by the fact that the guys behind the RevCanonical fiasco are still stubbornly refusing to admit they got it wrong (the whole while arrogantly brushing off increasingly direct protests from the standards community) I’ve whipped up a Google App Engine application which reasonably elegantly implements rel=shortlink: url shortening that really doesn’t hurt the […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Introducing rel=”shortlink”: a better alternative to URL shorteners

Yesterday I wrote rather critically about a surprisingly successful drive to implement a deprecated “rev” relationship. This developed virtually overnight in response to the growing “threat” (in terms of linkrot, security, etc.) of URL shorteners including tinyurl.com, bit.ly and their ilk. The idea is simple: allow the sites to specify short URLs in the document/feed […]

Categories
Internet Standards

rev=”canonical” considered harmful (complete with sensible solution)

Sites like http://tinyurl.com/ provide a very simple service: turning unwieldly but information rich URLs like http://samj.net/2009/04/open-letter-to-community-regarding-open.html into something more manageable like http://tinyurl.com/ceze29. This was traditionally useful for emails with some clients mangling long URLs but it also makes sense for URLs in documents, on TV, radio, etc. (basically anywhere a human has to manually enter […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Towards a Flash free YouTube killer (was: Adobe Flash penetration more like 50%)

A couple of days ago I wrote about Why Adobe Flash penetration is more like 50% than 99%, which resulted in a bunch of comments as well as a fair bit of discussion elsewhere including commentary from Adobe’s own John Dowdell. It’s good to see some healthy discussion on this topic (though it’s a shame […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Why Adobe Flash penetration is more like 50% than 99%

Slashdot discussed PC PRO’s “99% Flash Player Penetration – Too Good to be True?” article today which prompted me to explain why I have always been dubious of Adobe’s claim that “Flash content reaches 99.0% of Internet viewers“. Here’s the claim verbatim: Adobe Flash Player is the world’s most pervasive software platform, used by over […]