Categories
Cloud Standards

Is OCCI the HTTP of Cloud Computing?

The Web is built on the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), a client-server protocol that simply allows client user agents to retrieve and manipulate resources stored on a server. It follows that a single protocol could prove similarly critical for Cloud Computing, but what would that protocol look like? The first place to look for the […]

Categories
Cloud Internet Standards

rel=shortlink: url shortening that really doesn’t hurt the internet

Inspired primarily by the fact that the guys behind the RevCanonical fiasco are still stubbornly refusing to admit they got it wrong (the whole while arrogantly brushing off increasingly direct protests from the standards community) I’ve whipped up a Google App Engine application which reasonably elegantly implements rel=shortlink: url shortening that really doesn’t hurt the […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

CBS/CNET/ZDNet interview on cloud standards and platforms

I’m a bit too busy right now for putting together my usual meticulously crafted blog posts and random thoughts have found a good home at Twitter (@samj), so I thought I’d copy an interview this week with CBS/CNET/ZDNet on the emotive topic of cloud standards. As you know I’m busy putting the finishing touches on […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Introducing rel=”shortlink”: a better alternative to URL shorteners

Yesterday I wrote rather critically about a surprisingly successful drive to implement a deprecated “rev” relationship. This developed virtually overnight in response to the growing “threat” (in terms of linkrot, security, etc.) of URL shorteners including tinyurl.com, bit.ly and their ilk. The idea is simple: allow the sites to specify short URLs in the document/feed […]

Categories
Internet Standards

rev=”canonical” considered harmful (complete with sensible solution)

Sites like http://tinyurl.com/ provide a very simple service: turning unwieldly but information rich URLs like http://samj.net/2009/04/open-letter-to-community-regarding-open.html into something more manageable like http://tinyurl.com/ceze29. This was traditionally useful for emails with some clients mangling long URLs but it also makes sense for URLs in documents, on TV, radio, etc. (basically anywhere a human has to manually enter […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

An open letter to the community regarding “Open Cloud”

I write this letter in order to be 100% transparent with you about a new initiative that could prove critical to the development of computing and the Internet: the protection of the term “Open Cloud” with a certification trademark (like British Standards’ Kitemark® and the FAIRTRADE symbol) as well as its definition via an open […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

Introducing the Open Cloud Principles (OCP)

In light of the rapidly increasing (and at times questionable) use of the term “Open Cloud” I hereby propose the following (draft) set of principles, inspired by the Open Source Initiative (OSI) with their Open Source Definition (OSD). I would be interested to hear any feedback people have with a view to reaching a community […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

Cloud Standards Roadmap

Almost a year ago in “Cloud Standards: not so fast…” I explained why standardisation efforts were premature. A lot has happened in the interim and it is now time to start intensively developing standards, ideally by deriving the “consensus” of existing implementations. To get the ball rolling I’ve written a Cloud Standards Roadmap which can […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

Approaching cloud standards with *vendor* focus only is full of fail

So I was taking stock of the cloud standards situation and found an insightful article (Cloudy clouds and standards) over at ComputerWorld via a colourful counterpoint over at f5 (Approaching cloud standards with end-user focus only is full of fail), hence the title. I made a comment which quickly turned into a blog post of […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Towards a Flash free YouTube killer (was: Adobe Flash penetration more like 50%)

A couple of days ago I wrote about Why Adobe Flash penetration is more like 50% than 99%, which resulted in a bunch of comments as well as a fair bit of discussion elsewhere including commentary from Adobe’s own John Dowdell. It’s good to see some healthy discussion on this topic (though it’s a shame […]