Categories
Internet Standards

HTTP2 Expression of Interest

Here’s my (rather rushed) personal submission to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in response to their Call for Expressions of Interest in new work around HTTP; specifically, a new wire-level protocol for the semantics of HTTP (i.e., what will become HTTP/2.0), and new HTTP authentication schemes. You can also review the submissions of Facebook, Firefox, Google, Microsoft, […]

Categories
Internet Security Standards

RIP Adobe Flash (1996-2011) – now let’s bury the dead

Adobe kills mobile Flash, giving Steve Jobs the last laugh, reports The Guardian’s Charles Arthur following the late Steve Jobs’ epic Thoughts on Flash rant 18 months ago. It’s been about 2.5 years since I too got sick of Flash bringing my powerful Mac to its knees, so I went after the underlying lie that perpetuates […]

Categories
Internet Security Standards

Face it Flash, your days are numbered.

It’s no secret that I’m no fan of Adobe Flash: Why Adobe Flash penetration is more like 50% than 99% Towards a Flash free YouTube killer (was: Adobe Flash penetration more like 50%) HOWTO: Fix OS X by uninstalling Adobe Flash It should be no surprise then that I’m stoked to see a vigorous debate […]

Categories
Big Data Standards

NoSQL “movement” roadblocks HTML5 WebDB

Today’s rant is coming between me and a day of skiing so I’ll keep it brief. While trying to get to the bottom of why I can’t enjoy offline access to Google Apps & other web-based applications with Gears on Snow Leopard I came across a post noting Chrome, Opera to support html5 webdb, FF […]

Categories
Big Data Internet Standards

An open letter to the NoSQL community

Following some discussion on Twitter today I posted this thread to the nosql-discussion group. You can see the outcome for yourself (essentially, and unsurprisingly I might add, “please feel free to take your software and call it whatever you want“). While I don’t want to mess with their momentum (it’s a good cause, if branded […]

Categories
Internet Security Standards

Twitter’s down for the count. What are we going to do about it?

What’s wrong with this picture? There’s not a single provider for telephony (AT&T, T-Mobile, etc.) There’s not a single provider for text messaging (AT&T, T-Mobile, etc.) There’s not a single provider for instant messaging (GTalk, MSN, AIM, etc.) There’s not a single provider for e-mail (GMail, Hotmail, Yahoo!, etc.) There’s not a single provider for […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

“Bare Metal” cloud infrastructure “compute” services arrive

Earlier in the year during the formation of the Open Cloud Computing Interface (OCCI) working group I described three types of cloud infrastructure “compute” services: Physical Machines (“Bare Metal”) which are essentially dedicated servers provisioned on a utility basis (e.g. hourly), whether physically independent or just physically isolated (e.g. blades) Virtual Machines which nowadays uses […]

Categories
Cloud Standards Trademarks

“Twitter” Trademark in Trouble Too

Yesterday I apparently struck a nerve in revealing Twitter’s “Tweet” Trademark Torpedoed. The follow up commentary both on this blog and on Twitter itself was interesting and insightful, revealing that in addition to likely losing “tweet” (assuming you accept that it was ever theirs to lose) the recently registered Twitter trademark itself (#77166246) and pending […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Organising the Internet with Web Categories

In order to scratch an itch relating to the Open Cloud Computing Interface (OCCI) I submitted my first Internet-Draft to the IETF this week: Web Categories (draft-johnston-http-category-header). The idea’s fairly simple and largely inspired by the work of others (most notably the original HTTP and Atom authors, and a guy down under who’s working on […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

Is AtomPub already the HTTP of cloud computing?

A couple of weeks ago I asked Is OCCI the HTTP of cloud computing? I explained the limitations of HTTP in this context, which basically stem from the fact that the payloads it transfers are opaque. That’s fine when they’re [X]HTML because you can express links between resources within the resources themselves, but what about […]