Categories
Internet Standards

Why Adobe Flash penetration is more like 50% than 99%

Slashdot discussed PC PRO’s “99% Flash Player Penetration – Too Good to be True?” article today which prompted me to explain why I have always been dubious of Adobe’s claim that “Flash content reaches 99.0% of Internet viewers“. Here’s the claim verbatim: Adobe Flash Player is the world’s most pervasive software platform, used by over […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Native Web Applications (NWA) vs Rich Internet Applications (RIA)

A rewrite of the Rich Internet Application (RIA) article (snapshot) is my latest contribution to Wikipedia following last year’s full rewrite of the Cloud Computing article (which is now finally fairly stable and one of the main authorative sources on the topic; according to the article statistics I’ve just done my 500th edit, or one […]

Categories
Internet Mobile Security Standards

HOWTO: Reverse engineer the iPhone protocols

A few months back (‘Apple iPhone 2.0: The real story behind MobileMe Push Mail and Jabber/XMPP Chat‘) I analysed how the iPhone interacted with the new MobileMe service with a view to offering the same features to Google Apps customers. Unfortunately this is not yet possible (the APIs don’t exist on both sides of the […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

Cloud Computing: Bill of Rights (aka Ten Commandments)

I am pleased to share with you (at nearly 4am) the results of consolidating efforts by James Urquhart on his blog and Rich Wellner and I offline, by way of a draft of a ‘consensus’ Cloud Computing Bill of Rights or Ten Commandments available on the brand new Cloud Computing Community Wiki (http://wiki.cloudcommunity.org/). This MediaWiki […]

Categories
Cloud Software Standards

Cloud User Shell (cush) multi-call executable prototype released

After much discussion of what goes on below the water line (in the provider/enabler space), hopefully this prototype release will refocus energy and get the creative juices flowing above it (with the users themselves). The idea is to follow Unix’s example (as explained below) by seamlessly blending cloud resources into existing working environments. See examples […]

Categories
Cloud Standards

Cloud standards: not so fast…

The rate of innovation amongst cloud computing providers is mind boggling – developments are building on each other (for example look at the ecosystem which has sprung up overnight around Amazon Web Services) and advances are being made at a furious rate. Accordingly, the recent drive for ‘cloud standardisation’, while inevitable, is ill-conceived and premature. […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Writing Valid XHTML 1.1

There’s a lot of good reasons to write valid XHTML (even if the vast majority of sites don’t bother): Your site will render better, faster and more consistently across all browsers. Your layout will be pushed from tables and tags to CSS, separating data from presentation and reducing maintenance costs. Computers (most notably, search engines) […]

Categories
Internet Security Standards

Apple iPhone 2.0: The real story behind MobileMe Push Mail and Jabber/XMPP Chat

So those of you who anticipated a Jabber/XMPP chat client on the iPhone (and iPod Touch) after TUAW rumoured that ‘a new XMPP framework has been spotten(sic) in the latest iPhone firmware‘ back in April were close… but no cigar. Same applies for those who hypothesised about P-IMAP or IMAP IDLE being used by MobileMe […]

Categories
Internet Standards

Proof Gmail IMAP (Gimap) supports IMAP IDLE

So for those of you with capable mail clients (like OS X Mail.app), here’s proof that IMAP IDLE works for delivering push mail: $ openssl s_client -connect imap.gmail.com:993 -crlf * OK Gimap ready for requests from 1.2.3.4 0123456789abcdef . capability * CAPABILITY IMAP4rev1 UNSELECT IDLE NAMESPACE QUOTA XLIST CHILDREN XYZZY . OK Thats all she […]

Categories
Standards

OpenDocument (ODF) Acid Test Proof of Concept

Morning all, I’ve just put the finishing touches on the first proof-of-concept Acid Test for OpenDocument Format (ODF) which I hope will become a useful tool for encouraging and testing interoperability. The tests themselves (148 of them in the 14×14 grid following the Web Standards Project‘s Acid2 test) still need development, as explained below, but […]